How to Pick Dandelions for Dandelion Tea

  • PRACTICE CONSERVATION To every rule there is an exception. Many folks consider dandelions the exception.
  • POSITIVE IDENTIFICATION Play it safe. If you can’t make a positive identification on the plants yourself, go to someone knowledgeable who can, or don’t eat them.
  • AVOID CONTAMINATED AREAS Don’t ingest plants contaminated with toxic build-up from roadsides or sprayed areas.
  • FORAGE WITH PERMISSION With dandelions, the owner usually gives not only permission but also encouragement.
  • HARVEST GUIDE Leaves to make dandelion tea: Best picked Late winter – early spring.
  • A FACT ABOUT GREENS The greener the leaf, the higher the food value.
  • PREPARATION Once you pick the dandelion greens, wash them thoroughly to remove dirt particles. When clean, store them in a plastic bag which has holes punched for circulation, keeping them cold and humid. Use them as soon as possible, since greens are quite perishable. Select young, tender leaves for the tastiest dandelion tea.

10 Responses

  1. Ana Says:

    I thought you had to use the root to make tea, not the leaves. Thanks for clarifying, now I’m going to raid my back yard which has more Dandelions than my DH likes ;)

  2. Heather Price Says:

    Hi
    I am Heather Price from Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

    I have grown up with dandelions but only just started to pick them for my own use. Have been drinking roasted dandelion for decades however.

    Can you please tell me more about how to prepare the roots for tea?
    Thank you.
    And also – my sympathy on the passing of your dad – i lost my dad too on June 23rd – it is an amazing feeling having him so close to me now.
    Love, blessings and gratitude
    Heather Price

  3. Ruth Says:

    Thank you, Heather!

    A big smile spread across my face when I learned of your interest in dandelions, and I felt welcome warmth in my heart, that you took the time to write me. Then tears sprang into my eyes when I knew that you cared about my father’s passing. I am still mourning. You are the first person to comment in memory of my father and I am deeply moved that you care. You now hold a very dear place in my heart, as you are the first person to comment concerning expressing the love of a parent lost. My heart also goes out to you. I don’t know how you feel but I do know what such a tremendous loss feels like to me.

    I need to be at my sister’s daughter-in-law’s baby shower in an hour, and from there go to a choir party (potluck, and my husband and I are making a dish). I will continue this e-mail to you after that but wanted to send this now.

    With most heartfelt gratitude and appreciation to you, and also for your insightful, sensitive, beautiful comments,
    Love, Ruth

  4. Timea Says:

    Hi,
    I just became interested in dandelion leaf tea and we have plenty till winter but then, of course, we’ll have none till spring. Can the leaves be frozen? Has anyone tried?

    Thanks.

  5. miki Says:

    I was looking for a way to use dandiloins (my garden is WAY overrun with them) and this is exelent because i’m a major tea drinker, the nutrition is just an awsome bonus.

  6. Ransom Says:

    Hi All,
    My grandfather was a doctor and used to make dandelion wine. He ran a tuberculosis sanitorium. Think I will give the tea and wine making a try. I’ve eaten the greens before and where I live in the mountains of Colorado dandelions are everywhere.
    Thanks Ruth for the dandelion tea article.
    Ransom

  7. Dawnalee Says:

    Hello and thanks for the great info on making Dandelion Tea… I am sure going to give it a try… I am not so lucky as most people as the wild rabbits eat most of them… but that is fine.. I am going to make sure I save some for me… and is it possible to pick seeds from the roadside and through them in my field… or are they contaminated also..??????
    thanks again

  8. Rob Says:

    I have some plants growing in the yard that I think are Dandelion, but the look a little different than the ones on your site. They have the same spear-type leaf shape, but the plants themselves can get up to 3 feet tall and have multiple flower heads. The flowers look an awful lot like Dandelion flowers too and turn into the puffy white flower when aged a coupe of weeks.

    Is this a Dandelion plant? Are there variations. I’m in the U.S. Southeast on the coast. Any insight you can offer would be great!

  9. cottie rebel Says:

    3/15/11 thanks for info about dandelions iam from the south usa, and all ways told ]misinformid]about them. thanks for the knowlage,i am going to brew myself a bach and enjoy the tea.

  10. JOSEPH A MUELLER, SR Says:

    RECENTLY I TOOK A SERIOUS INTEREST IN HERBAL TEAS FOR MY HEALTH.

    I AM DIABETIC, I HAVE HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE, I RETAIN ALOT OF WATER DUE TO CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE, I ALSO SUFFERFRON ACUTE ANXIETY, ETC.

    DIFFERENT TEAS HELP ME IN DIFFERENT AREAS, I HAV’NT TRIED DANDELION TEA YET.

    I BASICALLY PICK FOR WINE, AND USE THE ROOTS FOR TINTURES, ETC.

    THE LEAVES, YOU SAY USE THEM GREEN? OR CAN I DRY THEM OUT?

    WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO DRY THE ROOTS? IN ORDER TO GET THE PROPERTY VALUE FOR TINTURES/ELIXERS?

    JOE MUELLER

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Posted on August 14th, 2008 by ruth and filed under dandelion tea | 10 Comments »